Boyce Man Cited For Night Hunting Violations

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement agents cited a Rapides Parish man on April 3 for alleged deer hunting violations.

Agents cited Jonathan Pace, 31, of Boyce, for taking deer during a closed season, taking deer during illegal hours, taking deer from a public road, failing to comply with deer tagging requirements, possession of an illegally taken deer and intentional concealment of wildlife.

Agents were contacted by a Rapides Parish Sheriff’s Deputy that stated he discovered a freshly killed deer at a resident in Boyce.  Upon arriving and examining the remains, agents determined the deer was recently killed with a firearm.

Agents located other items around the property that were consistent with a deer being killed and processed at the residence.  Agents spoke with Pace later that evening when he admitted to killing the deer off of Hwy. 28 on April 2 around 11:30 p.m.

During the investigation, Pace also admitted to killing two other antlerless deer during nighttime hours this year with one on Jan. 13 and the other on Jan. 15.  Neither of these deer were tagged or validated.

Agents seized an antlerless deer and a 12 gauge shotgun.

Taking deer during a closed season, during illegal hours and intentional concealment of wildlife each brings a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.  Possession of an illegally taken deer carries a $400 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.  Taking deer from a public road and failing comply with deer tagging requirements each carries a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.

Pace may also face civil restitution totaling $4,873 for the replacement value of the three illegally taken deer.

Initial Results Negative for CWD in Northeast LA

April 6, 2017 – Initial sampling efforts by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) for chronic wasting disease (CWD) in East Carroll, Madison and Tensas parishes have not turned up any positive results of the disease.

LDWF has sampled 188 deer from the three parishes, located in northeast Louisiana, with results received back on 114 of the specimens on April 3, with no positives detected. The results from the other 74 samples will be received within the next three weeks while additional sampling continues inside the buffer zone area within these parishes.

The sampling measures are part of LDWF’s CWD Response Plan. It was triggered by the discovery of a buck that tested positive for CWD in Issaquena County, Mississippi, on Jan. 25. Issaquena County borders northeast Louisiana and the deer was found only a few miles from the Louisiana border on the east side of the Mississippi River.

LDWF’s target sample size is 300 deer within the buffer zone, which is within 25 miles of the case in Issaquena County. This sample size will provide a 95 percent confidence interval that sampling would detect CWD at a prevalence rate of 1 percent. LDWF continues to work with private landowners to obtain consent for sampling efforts and would like to thank landowners who have been willing to assist and cooperate with LDWF’s sampling project.

Mississippi has also sampled in the area in its state and, with 158 results back, has not detected the disease outside the one case in Issaquena County.

In addition to the LDWF sampling, supplemental deer feeding in East Carroll, Madison and Tensas parishes has been suspended as part of the response plan.

CWD is a neurodegenerative disease found in most deer species, including moose, elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer. It is infectious and always fatal. It is part of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and is similar to BSE (Bovine spongiform encephalopathy or mad cow disease) of cattle and scrapie in sheep. These diseases cause irreversible damage to brain tissue that leads to salivation, neurological symptoms, emaciation and death of the animal.

Deer infected with CWD can spread the disease even before symptoms develop. It can take one to two years for infected animals to become symptomatic. When symptoms appear, they can include emaciation, lethargy, abnormal behavior and loss of bodily functions. Other signs include excessive salivation, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, teeth grinding and drooping ears.

For more information, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/CWD .

Grassy Lake WMA Closed Due to Flooding

From News Report

March 12, 2018 –   The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has closed all roads at the Grassy Lake Wildlife Management Area (WMA) due to flooding.

Increasing water levels in associated river systems and heavy rainfall has caused flooding on these roads. Once the water recedes, LDWF will inspect, repair and reopen the roads when deemed safe for travel.

Grassy Lake WMA is located in northeastern Avoyelles Parish, approximately 12 miles from Bordelonville, Louisiana.

For information on this WMA, go to htt://www.wlf.la.gov/wma/36994 or contact Steven David at 337-948-0255 or sdavid@wlf.la.gov or Tony Vidrine at 337-948-0255 or tvidrine@wlf.la.gov .

East Carroll, Madison, and Tensas Parish Feeding Ban Now in Effect

From News Report

March 6, 2018 – A ban on supplemental deer feeding in East Carroll, Madison and Tensas parishes is now in effect in an effort to potentially curb the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD), recently discovered in Issaquena County, Mississippi, about five miles from the Louisiana border.

The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC) approved a Declaration of Emergency to cease supplemental deer feeding in those parishes at its March meeting Thursday (March 1). It became effective Monday (March 5). To read the entire Declaration of Emergency go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/action-items .

The action comes after the discovery of a buck that tested positive for CWD in Mississippi on Jan. 25. Issaquena County borders northeast Louisiana.

The action is part of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) CWD Response Plan, designed to monitor and curb the potential spread of CWD into Louisiana.

According to the declaration, the use of bait not normally ingested by deer for feral hog trapping will still be allowed.  All bait must be placed and contained within the trap itself. Backyard bird feeders are also exempt from the declaration.

Baits that are permitted include commercially sold baits formulated and labeled for feral hog trapping, commercial fish based baits and soured grains, including whole shell corn soaked in water and fermented. Rice bran, non-fermented or whole cracked corn, soybeans, protein pellets and commercial feeds formulated for deer are prohibited from use in feral hog traps during the ban.

CWD is a neurodegenerative disease found in most deer species, including moose, elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer. It is infectious and always fatal. It is part of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and is similar to BSE (Bovine spongiform encephalopathy or mad cow disease) of cattle and scrapie in sheep. These diseases cause irreversible damage to brain tissue that leads to salivation, neurological symptoms, emaciation and death of the animal.

Deer infected with CWD can spread the disease even before symptoms develop. It can take one to two years for infected animals to become symptomatic. When symptoms appear, they can include emaciation, lethargy, abnormal behavior and loss of bodily functions. Other signs include excessive salivation, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, teeth grinding and drooping ears.

LDWF has tested more than 8,300 deer since 2002 and has not detected CWD. For more information, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/CWD .

RECAP: Scores & Earnings from LABH 3D Challenge

It was a picture perfect day to be in the woods of Central Louisiana, participating in the 1st Annual LABH 3D Challenge. Sponsored by Hardcore Custom Bowstrings. Thanks to CENLA Bowbenders for providing the beautiful property, our sponsors, vendors, spectators, volunteers and especially the shooters. We had over 150 shooters from 3 different states travel to Pollock for the inaugural event. Men and women, boys and girls competed in the ultimate 3D competition Louisiana Bowhunters have been begging for. Over $2,000 cash was awarded, plus a bow, cooler, and tons of other items were given away to over a dozen participants.

Our first novelty shoot was the Iron Buck Challenge. Shooters shot at a 1/4″ aluminum silhouette of a buck with soft target vitals. Starting at 20 yards moving back in specific, known increments until only 1 shooter remained. Hitting the metal destroyed dozens of arrows and the errant shots were immediately confirmed with a “Gong” and explosion of carbon as they struck the metal buck.  Michael Cash was the last man standing with the Iron Buck reaching 70 yards! He took home $185.

Our second novelty shoot was the unknown range Long Shot. A brown bear stood 99 yards away and downhill. This shot had a long line of determined shooters all day. Jerod Perkins took home 50% of the pot at $183 and a PSE Infinity bow package donated by Man Cave Archery. The other 50% is being donated to the Archery in Louisiana Schools Program. 

Our main range had a mixture of sitting brush-blind shots, sitting and standing lock-on stand shots, some reverse and side angled shots from stands, a running bobcat shot and some pretty steep decline shots. We tried to give hunters a genuine “hunting” feel to the shoot with situations you would encounter during deer season. (We never recommend shooting running animals. That target was just for fun) 4 classes competed and their scores are as follows:

Traditional

  1. Anthony Denton   160
  2. James Nunn          155
  3. Daniel Binkly         148

General Hunter

 

  1. David Constance   208
  2. Stephen Severn     202
  3. Toni Romero          189

Open                                              Shootdown               Total

  1. Larry Edwards         220                52                          272
  2. Zach Hester            218                51                          269
  3. Jeremiah Oalmann 214                50                          264
Bowhunter                                  Shootdown                 Total
     1. Buddy Freeman    220                38                            258
     2. Logan Sobiesk      202                52                            254
     3. Justin Rushing      210                38                            248
 

Supplemental Feeding Banned In Select LA Parishes

FROM NEWS REPORT

March 1, 2018 – The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC) approved a Declaration of Emergency to cease supplemental deer feeding in East Carroll, Madison and Tensas parishes in an effort to curb the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD) during its monthly meeting Thursday in Baton Rouge. The ban becomes effective Monday (March 5).

The action comes after the discovery of a buck that tested positive for CWD in Issaquena County, Mississippi, on Jan. 25. Issaquena County borders northeast Louisiana and the deer was found only a few miles from the Louisiana border on the east side of the Mississippi River.

The Declaration of Emergency reads, in part: “The immediate cessation of all supplemental feeding, including mineral or salt licks, is hereby initiated for East Carroll, Madison and Tensas parishes. The purpose of this feeding ban is to reduce the potential for the spread of CWD into Louisiana by reducing the risk of exposure when deer are concentrated around feeding sites.”

To read the entire Declaration of Emergency go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/action-items .

The action is part of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) CWD Response Plan designed to monitor and curb the potential spread of CWD into Louisiana.

According to the declaration, the use of bait not normally ingested by deer for feral hog trapping will still be allowed. All bait must be placed and contained within the trap itself. Backyard bird feeders are also exempt from the declaration.

CWD is a neurodegenerative disease found in most deer species, including moose, elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer. It is infectious and always fatal. It is part of a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and is similar to BSE (Bovine spongiform encephalopathy or mad cow disease) of cattle and scrapie in sheep. These diseases cause irreversible damage to brain tissue that leads to salivation, neurological symptoms, emaciation and death of the animal.

Deer infected with CWD can spread the disease even before symptoms develop. It can take one to two years for infected animals to become symptomatic. When symptoms appear, they can include emaciation, lethargy, abnormal behavior and loss of bodily functions. Other signs include excessive salivation, loss of appetite, progressive weight loss, excessive thirst and urination, teeth grinding and drooping ears.

LDWF has tested more than 8,300 deer since 2002 and has not detected CWD. For more information, go to http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/hunting/CWD .

ATTN: St Mary Parish and Surrounding Residents $5500 Reward

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement agents are seeking leads for two illegally killed black bears in St. Mary Parish.

A citizen alerted authorities on Feb. 14, 2018 about a dead black bear that was located off of Humble Canal in a marshy area about 10 miles south of Franklin.  Agents responded to the scene and found another dead black bear about a mile in a half away from the first reported black bear.

A necropsy revealed that both of the adult male bears were shot and illegally killed around Feb. 2 to 4, which was a weekend.

The Humane Society of the United States, the Acadiana Chapter of Safari Club International, the Safari Club International Foundation and LDWF’s Operation Game Thief program are teaming up to offer a reward totaling $5,500 to anyone with information that leads to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the illegal killing of these black bears.

Anyone with information regarding this illegal killing should call the Louisiana Operation Game Thief hotline at 1-800-442-2511 or use LDWF’s tip411 program.  To use the tip411 program, citizens can text LADWF and their tip to 847411 or download the “LADWF Tips” iPhone and Android app from the Apple App Store or Google Play free of charge.

The hotline and the tip411 program are monitored 24 hours a day. Upon request, informants can remain anonymous.

Multiple WMA’s Face Road Closures Due to Flooding

Road Closures due to rising flood waters across  state WMA’s are as follows:

Dewey W. Wills WMA

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) will close Sandy Bayou Road and Muddy Bayou Road from Deville Crossing to Nolan Bayou Road at Dewey W. Wills Wildlife Management Area (WMA) once the water level on Larto Lake reaches 42 feet mean sea level (MSL), which is expected Tuesday (Feb. 27).

In addition, the portion of Hunt Road located south of the diversion canal will be closed to all traffic once the water level on Larto Lake reaches 45 feet MSL, which is expected Friday (March 2).

Current water level for the Larto Lake Gauge is available at: http://rivergages.mvr.usace.army.mil/WaterControl/stationinfo2.cfm?sid=CE7F3AA4&fid=&dt=S 

ATV/UTV usage on the WMA will be permitted for access to Sandy Bayou Road.

Increasing water levels in the Mississippi, Black and associated river systems will create backwater flooding on these roads. Once the water recedes and conditions allow, the roads will be reopened.

Richard K. Yancey WMA

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has closed several roads to vehicle traffic at the Richard K. Yancey Wildlife Management Area (WMA) due to flooding, including Dobbs Bay Road, Union Point Road, Lincecum Road, Blackhawk Road and the partial closure of Blount Road paralleling Patton Lake Loop Road.

Increasing water levels in associated river systems and heavy rainfall has caused flooding on these roads. Once the water recedes, LDWF will inspect, repair and reopen the roads when deemed safe for travel.

Russell Sage WMA

 The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) has closed the main road from Ruby Road Kiosk to Ouachita Parish Landfill on Russell Sage Wildlife Management Area (WMA) due to flooding.

Increasing water levels in associated river systems has caused backwater flooding on this thoroughfare. Once the water recedes, the road will be reopened.

CWD Cases Now Surround Louisiana

Texas and Arkansas are no strangers to dealing with the deadly disease that is striking down whitetail herds across the nation.  Now, Mississippi is the latest state to confirm a case within its state’s deer herd.

From News Report 

JACKSON – A white-tailed deer collected on January 25, 2018, in Issaquena County has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).  The deer was a 4.5-year-old male that died of natural causes and was reported to the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks.

This is the first time an animal in Mississippi has tested positive for the disease, which is fatal to white-tailed deer.  MDWFP will immediately implement the CWD Response Plan under the auspices of the Commission on Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks.

Pursuant to the Order of the Executive Director on behalf of the Commission, effectively immediately, supplemental feeding is banned in the following counties:  Claiborne, Hinds, Issaquena, Sharkey, Warren, and Yazoo.

CWD was first documented among captive mule deer in Colorado in 1967, and has been confirmed in 24 states, three Canadian provinces, and two foreign countries.  It has been found in the free-ranging herds in 22 states and among captive cervids in 16 states.

According to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance, CWD affects only cervids (hoofed animals in the cervidae family such as deer, elk, and moose).  CWD affects the body’s nervous system.  Once in the host’s body, prions transform normal cellular protein into an abnormal shape that accumulates until the cell ceases to function.  Infected animals begin to lose weight, lose their appetite, and develop an insatiable thirst.  They tend to stay away from herds, walk in patterns, carry their head low, salivate, and grind their teeth.

For more information regarding CWD in Mississippi, visit their website at www.mdwfp.com

Trespasser Caught By Trail Camera Photos

From News Report

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries enforcement agents arrested a Bethany man for alleged criminal and hunting violations on Feb. 3 in Caddo Parish.

Agents arrested Richard Wilson Jr., 38, for resisting an officer, theft, hunting without basic and big game hunting licenses, hunting deer during illegal hours, failing to comply with deer tagging regulations, criminal trespassing, and hunting deer using illegal methods.

Agents received a tip about a man being caught on a game camera hunting at night on a private lease without permission.  Agents setup surveillance on the area and observed a man fitting the description hunting at night.  When agents approached the man and identified themselves as LDWF agents, the man fled the area on foot.

Through further investigation, agents were able to identify the man as Wilson Jr.  Agents then got a search and arrest warrant for Wilson Jr.  Upon serving the warrants and during questioning, Wilson Jr. admitted to illegally hunting at night, not possessing the required hunting licenses, stealing game cameras, and using a .17 caliber rifle to hunt deer.

Wilson Jr. also admitted to taking an antlered deer during the 2016-17 hunting season and two antlered deer during the 2017-18 hunting season all at night without tags.

Agents seized two rifles, three sets of antlers and packaged deer meat.

Hunting deer at night carries a $900 to $950 fine and up to 120 days in jail.  Hunting deer using illegal methods brings a $250 to $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail.  Failing to comply with deer tagging regulations carries a $100 to $350 fine and up to 60 days in jail.  Hunting without basic and big game licenses each brings up to a $50 fine and 15 days in jail for each offense.

Resisting an officer carries up to a $500 fine and six months in jail.  Theft brings up to a $3,000 fine and five years in jail.  Criminal trespassing carries a $100 to $500 fine and up to 30 days in jail.

Wilson Jr. may also face civil restitution totaling $4,873 for the replacement value of the illegally taken deer.